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dltutorialconclusion

Page history last edited by Jennifer 10 years, 10 months ago

Conclusion

 

You now should have some basic strategies for beginning your research. Remember, if you have questions you can always ask a librarian. Contact the librarian in your course, write the Distance Learning Librarians at dlref@roosevelt.edu or use any of the other contact options available on the Library website. You can also use the following sites to help you learn more about research and writing.

 

LibGuides

 

http://libguides.roosevelt.edu/browse.php

 

These guides will lead you to journals, books, and free websites on a variety of subjects. A great place to start Library research!

 

Online Reference Sources

 

http://www2.roosevelt.edu/library/newsite/online_reference_sources.htm

 

These tools are primarily reference tools like encyclopedias, dictionaries, almanacs, etc. that the Library has subscribed to online. They can be helpful when you want background information on a topic.

 

What Is a Scholarly Journal?

 

http://www2.roosevelt.edu/library/research-aids/ScholarlyvsPopularAid12-05.pdf

 

Tip sheet to help you understand the difference between a scholarly/peer reviewed journal and a popular magazine.

 

Evaluating Web Sources

 

http://www2.roosevelt.edu/library/distance-learning/evaluating-web-sources-guide10-06.pdf

 

Brief guide to help you evaluate websites as research sources.

 

Writing Tools & Citation Guides

 

http://www2.roosevelt.edu/library/citation.htm

 

Links to citation help. Try the "OWL at Purdue" links for the most information. (Scroll down to the bottom of the OWL page for help creating citations.)

 

Congratulations on completing the Library Research Tutorial!

 

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